Natural hazards

Taranaki's location on the active Pacific-Australian plate boundary means we are susceptible to hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and tsunami. We are also subject to weather-related hazards such as floods, storms and tornadoes.

Drought

Weather drought

Drought events are one of New Zealand's most costly natural hazards and have a significant impact on agricultural production.

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Earthquakes

Earthquake

Taranaki has a number of active fault lines particularly in the Inglewood, Waverley and Oaonui areas as well as off-shore.

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Floods

Floods

Experts generally agree that climate change is affecting New Zealand’s weather patterns. An increase in extreme rainfall is likely as the temperature increases through the 21st century, potentially increasing both the severity and frequency of flooding.

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Tsunami

Tsunami

A tsunami is a series of water surges caused when a large volume of water in the sea, or in a lake, is rapidly moved by earthquakes, slips, or volcanic eruptions.

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Storms & tornadoes

Weather tornado

In Taranaki, rainfall is predicted to decrease in summer and increase in winter. Gale and storm force winds from the west are also predicted to increase.

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Volcanic

Volcano

A volcanic eruption of Mt Taranaki (Egmont Volcano) has been assessed as a moderate-very high hazard for the Taranaki region and as one of three regional hazards with national significance.

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